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This Week's Editorial
Another Perspective PDF Print E-mail
Written by Lori Pankonin, The Imperial Republican   

Familiar ring of cherished children’s book sticks

Did you join others from across the country to celebrate Ted Geisel’s birthday in March? Who’s Ted Geisel?

How about Dr. Seuss? Does that sound more familiar? Aw, yes. Who hasn’t heard of Dr. Seuss, the creator of popular children’s books with a rather unique and quirky twist?

March 2, his birthday, is officially Read Across America Day when elementary schools across the country celebrate the joy of reading.

Interestingly enough, Theodor Seuss Geisel got into some trouble during his senior year at the Ivy League Dartmouth College in 1925. Ten students were caught drinking in his room. The dean put them all on probation and stripped Geisel of his editorship of the college’s humor magazine. Geisel continued to publish cartoons under aliases. Seuss, his middle name and his mother’s maiden name, was one of those choices.

During graduate school at Oxford, a classmate noticed that Ted did more doodling than note taking during lectures. Helen, who would eventually become his wife, commented on his great flying cow and said he was crazy to think he wanted to be a professor when what he obviously enjoyed was drawing.

To view the full article, consider an e-Subscription to the Enterprise. Call 970-854-2811.



Holyoke Enterprise March 26, 2015

 
Kid Tested, Uncle Approved PDF Print E-mail
Written by Lincoln L. Hayes   

Disney’s “Atlantis: The Lost Empire”

It was around middle school that I stopped watching the new Disney animated movies. I was growing out of cartoons (yeah, look at me now) and frankly, wasn’t a huge fan of the animation style of the late ’90s-early 2000s.

The design was very geometric and boxy, and it looked like their movies from the early ’80s, which, being a kid who can only like new stuff, how could I possibly suffer through something that looked so old? Yeah, I was a dumb kid.

Anyway, one of the movies I missed during that time was “Atlantis: The Lost Empire.” It’s the story of linguist Milo Thatch who believes he is on the path to finding the lost civilization of Atlantis but lacks the funding for the expedition. When exocentric millionaire Preston Whitmore reveals he’s been planning the expedition for years after losing a bet to Milo’s grandfather, Milo is on his way to the bottom of the sea, in search of the ultimate power source, the Heart of Atlantis.

To view the full article, consider an e-Subscription to the Enterprise. Call 970-854-2811.



Holyoke Enterprise March 26, 2015

 
Extension Corner PDF Print E-mail
Written by Linda Langelo, Golden Plains Area Extension   

Pollinators and lawns — the truth

I am sharing with my readers information from High Country Gardens’ blog from the article titled “Bringing Nature Home: Interview with Doug Tallamy.”

One of the interview questions posed to Tallamy was, “Why are insects, not just pollinators, critical to maintaining the diversity of other species?”

His answer was to reference an article titled “The Little Things That Run The World” by E.O. Wilson. This is information that everyone needs to understand and, when needed, take the appropriate action. What he had to say is both a compelling and bold statement of facts. The scary part is this is fact.

The following is what I extracted from Wilson’s article:

Insects actually sustain life on land. Insects are the basis of food webs and transfer energy to all other animals. If you eliminate insects, you eliminate other species. If you eliminate pollinators, you eliminate 90 percent of our flowering plants.

To view the full article, consider an e-Subscription to the Enterprise. Call 970-854-2811.



Holyoke Enterprise March 26, 2015

 
Home Connection PDF Print E-mail
Written by Holyoke Enterprise   

Question: What is mortgage insurance, and why would I need it?

Most people need to borrow money in order to purchase a home, and so they take what is called a mortgage. The borrower then repays the loan over a period of years, typically on a monthly basis.

Mortgage insurance is an additional charge on your monthly house payment (or a one-time, up-front payment) that may be required by banks, government lenders or mortgage lending companies (“the lenders”) for certain types of loans. It is designed to protect “the lenders” in the event you are unable to keep up with your monthly loan payments.

There are two types of mortgage insurance available — government sponsored and private (called PMI). If you get a loan from either the Federal Housing Authority or the Veterans Administration, then your mortgage insurance is being provided by that agency.

To view the full article, consider an e-Subscription to the Enterprise. Call 970-854-2811.



Holyoke Enterprise March 26, 2015